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Louden also made an overhead garage door set.

An "E-Z Over Door Set" was found on a local garage.

The overhead door still operated properly, but the owner wanted an electric door-lifter, which could not be fitted to this door.  In August, 2004, it was donated to the Jefferson County Historic Preservation Commission and placed in storage, pending a display location.

Louden brochures show this door hardware set, but the brochures are not dated.  This "E-Z Over Door Set" was probably installed about 1940 for R. Bruce Louden, who lived in this house.

Pulleys were used to connect cables from wheels on the side of the door to a box which contained weights (or sand or rocks).  The amount of weight in the box could be adjusted until it just balanced the weight of the door as it was opened.

   Scroll down to see a photo essay of this garage door.

The garage with the door open.  It was apparently built about 1940.
Garage exterior

Inside the garage, looking at the door.  The weight-box is the silver box at the top left.
Inside the garage, looking at the door. The weight-box is the silver box at the top left.

Since the door is now closed, the weight-box is at the top of it's travel.
The weight of the door holds the weight-box up with cables that travel over pulleys.
Since the door is now closed, the weight-box is at the top of it's travel. The weight of the door holds the weight-box up with cables that travel over pulleys.

When the door is opened, the weight-box drops, pulling the door open.
The bricks may have been used to fine-tune the weights in the box.
When the door is opened, the weight-box drops, pulling the door open. The bricks may have been used to fine-tune the weights in the box.

The weight-box again.  Note the product name on the box.
The weight-box again. Note the product name on the box.

At the top center of the door is a "T" shaped casting that runs in an overhead channel.
On each side are wheels that run in tracks, just like today's overhead doors.
At the top center of the door is a T shaped casting that runs in an overhead channel. On each side are wheels that run in tracks, just like today's overhead doors.

With the door is open, you can see how the center door support travels in a channel.
With the door is open, you can see how the center door support travels in a channel.

The overhead channel is supported by a simple wooden framework.
The overhead channel is supported by a simple wooden framework.

A wheel is mounted on each side of the door and rides in a track, just like modern doors.
This is the right side, looking from inside the garage.  Note the cable that pulls the door up.
A wheel is mounted on each side of the door and rides in a track, just like modern doors.<br> This is the right side, looking from inside the garage. Note the cable that pulls the door up.

The wheel in the track on the other side of the door is hard to see in this photo.
The door is not hinged.
The wheel in the track on the other side of the door is hard to see in this photo.<br> The door is not hinged.

The pulleys guide the cable over to the weight-box.  (Door is closed.)
The pulleys guide the cable over to the weight-box. (Door is closed.)

Pulleys in full view.  The door has been removed (the door opening is to the right).
Pulleys in full view. The door has been removed (the door opening is to the right).

The pulleys guide the cables to the weight-box.
The pulleys guide the cables to the weight-box.

Another view.  The door opening is to the right, in the background.
Another view. The door opening is to the right, in the background.

More pulley detail.
More pulley detail.

The pulleys and the steel support bracket.
The pulleys and the steel support bracket.

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